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In this webinar, we will demonstrate how atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to acquire ultra-high-resolution images of individual PTFE-molecules on the semi-crystalline surface of commercial Teflon tape. Both high resolution and high-speed scanning capabilities of Park Systems NX20 AFM will be demonstrated on the real-world polymer sample.



 
 

Nailing down Teflon Molecules - High Resolution AFM imaging for Polymer Science

Thursday, November 12, 2020

  • 10:00 am – 11:30 am
    (GMT)
    London, Dublin
  • 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
    (CEST)
    Berlin, Paris, Rome
  • 18:00pm – 19:30 pm
    [UTC+9]
    Seoul, Tokyo


Various macroscopic properties of polymers are strongly influenced by packing and conformation of individual macromolecules as well as their monomer composition. Therefore, being able to resolve individual polymer chains in real space is crucial in understanding the overall structure of polymers.
In this webinar, we will demonstrate how atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to acquire ultra-high-resolution images of individual PTFE-molecules on the semi-crystalline surface of commercial Teflon tape. Both high resolution and high-speed scanning capabilities of Park Systems NX20 AFM will be demonstrated on the real-world polymer sample.

Presented By : 
Dr. Vladimir Korolkov - Senior Application Scientist at Park Systems UK

Vladimir received his PhD in Chemistry from Moscow University in 2008. Then, he moved to the University of Heidelberg and specialized in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of thin films, following by the position at the University of Nottingham, where he discovered his passion for Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), and became a strong advocate of SPM techniques to unlock structure and properties at nanoscale. He pioneered the use of higher eigenmodes of standard cantilevers to routinely achieve resolution that was previously thought to be exclusively limited to STM and UHV-STM. Vladimir published more than 40 scientific papers, including three in Nature family journals. He left academia in 2018 to contribute to the industrial site of SPM technology.

 

 

 

Park Lectures - Park Atomic Force Microscope